PEUGEOT 306 AND RENAULT TOOLS






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Here are a few tools I made to help work on my Peugeot 306.


 

1. McPherson Strut lifter
2. Bolt shifter
3. Hub holder
4. Front wheel bearing puller
5. Circlip remover
6. DW10D - Flywheel Timing - locking pin
7. TU3MC - Flywheel Timing - locking pin
8. DW10D - Timing Belt - top cover bolt tool
9. DW10D - Timing Belt - tensioner pulley tool
10. DW10D - Auxilliary Belt - tensioner arm tool.
11. TU3MC - Cylinder Head - releasing tool
12. Valve Spring Compressor
13. TU3MC - Camshaft Sprocket holder

 


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↓ Peugeot 306 - I made this to help lift the McPherson Strut out of the front wheel hub. Mine were rusted in solid.
I was told to bash hell out of the hub in order to release the strut. Instead I made this tool and it allowed me to twist the strut slightly back and forth while pulling it up away from the hub. It took quite while but I got there in the end.
The ring is about 50mm internal diameter and is a really close fit. It grips the strut well without crushing it.

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↓ Peugeot 306 - This simple tool is used to remove stubborn bolts.
I used it to remove the front McPherson Strut lower pinch bolt which was rusted in solid. By design, the head of the bolt cannot be turned as one of the hex flats butts up against a flat surface on the hub casting.
The tool fits over the head of the bolt. A clamp can then be positioned over the other end of the bolt and tightened up to push the bolt out of its hole towards the bolt head.
The tool allows the clamp to fit over each end of the bolt, but still allows the bolt head to move as it is pressed out.
An impact chisel would have taken care of the bolt in seconds, but I do not have one.
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↓ Peugeot 306 - This simple tool holds the wheel hub steady.
Two of the wheel bolts secure the tool on the hub.
It comes in handy when replacing brake discs.
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↓ Peugeot 306 - Front wheel bearing puller.
This press tool is used to remove and install a front wheel bearing.
Eye protection must definitely be worn as I managed to cleanly snap and pull apart a length of 12mm studding using this tool.
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A bearing has just been removed.
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Here are all the pieces I made for it.
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↓ Peugeot 306 - Large circlip compression tool.
This is made from silver steel so I could heat treat it and harden the nipples.
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↓ Peugeot 306 2.0 HDI RHY DW10D - Timing Belt - Flywheel locking tool.
This tool fits in a hole through the flange over on the gearbox side of the engine and locates in a timing hole in the Flywheel.
The hole is buried behind the starter motor. As someone else said ' you need fingers like ET to reach it'.
You could take starter motor off to provide easier access, but I thought it would be easier to make a tool.
I shoved a thin snake light down behind the starter motor which made it so much easier to see clearly.

Before I made the tool I used a 1.5mm thin piece of wire to easily get the required shape. I then formed the 6mm version by copying the angles on the thin piece of wire and bending the thick rod in a vice.

The round bar is 6mm diameter, salvaged from a printer.
A - To make it easier to hold the tool, I brazed a scrap piece of 20mm square mild steel on the end of it.
B - I put a 10 degree bend in the bar to make it easier to hold straight (I did this last).
C - The 60 degree bend is to curve the tool around the starter motor body.
F - The 90 degree bend points the tool towards the hole.
D - The 50 degree double set gets the tool over towards the hole.
E - I put 6 saw marks on the end to enable me to be confident that the tool gets pushed into the Flywheel timing hole.
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↓ Peugeot 306 1.4 TU3MC - Timing Belt - Flywheel locking tool.
It is so much easier to get at the Flywheel timing hole on this engine.
This tool is simply a 6mm diameter rod, 200mm long, with a 90 degree bend on it. The rod was salvaged from a printer.
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↓ Peugeot 306 2.0 HDI RHY DW10D - Timing Belt - Top Cover bolt tool.
There is a very awkward bolt on the Top Timing Cover. The bolt is at the back of the engine, below the Master Cylinder and you can just about get your hand in the tight space.
I brazed a 10mm socket onto a mild steel bar. The bar is 6mm square and 70mm long.
It made things so much easier as I could hold the tool in one hand and fiddle about with the bolt.
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↓ Peugeot 306 2.0 HDI RHY DW10D - Timing Belt - Tensioner Pulley tool.
This tool fits in the square hole of the Timing Belt Manual Tensioner Pulley.
It allows you to hold the Tensioner Pulley whilst tightening/loosening the Tensioner Pulley bolt.
It consists of a piece of brass, just under 8mm square and 30mm long.
The handle is a piece of mild steel, 6mm square and 100mm long.
I drilled a 3mm hole through both parts, inserted a 3mm rod, and brazed it all together.
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↓ Peugeot 306 2.0 HDI RHY DW10D - Auxilliary Belt - Tensioner Arm tool.
This tool fits in the middle hole on the Tensioner Arm, the one that has the belt wear indicator on it.
It is simply a 200mm long 4mm diameter rod with a 90 degree bend on it that is 45mm long.
When in place it holds the Tensioner Arm back whilst you remove and refit the Auxilliary Belt.
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↓ Peugeot 306 1.4 TU3MC - Cylinder Head - releasing tool.
This tool is used to lever and gently rock the cylinder head to release it without disturbing the wet liners (as per the Haynes manual).
The bolt holes in the cylinder head were about 11.5mm diameter. The rod I had was only 9.5mm and so was a rattling fit in the cylinder head bolt holes. To make the rods a tighter fit in the bolt holes I made a couple of sleeves.
This tool is simply a 9.5mm diameter rod, 300mm long, with a 90 degree bend on it 100mm long.
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↓ The wider section on the sleeves prevents them falling down too far into the cylinder head bolt holes.
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↓ The sleeves slip on over the the rod and snuggly fit the cylinder head bolt holes.
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↓ Peugeot 306 1.4 TU3MC - Cylinder Head - valve spring compressor.
Here is a homemade valve spring compressor.

Click here to see how the valve spring compressor was made

 

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↓ Peugeot 306 1.4 TU3MC - Camshaft Sprocket - assembly and removal tool.
Here is another tool as per the Haynes manual.
This tool is used to hold the Camshaft Sprocket stationary while the Camshaft Sprocket Retaining Bolt is slackened or tightened.
Instead of using two bolts to engage in the Camshaft Sprocket spokes I made two 'buttons' that were a nice snug fit in the spokes.
The snug fitting 'buttons' controlled the Sprocket while I slackened and tightened the Camshaft Sprocket Retaining Bolt.
Making the two buttons took a bit of time and I spent longer than I should have; but the 20 seconds it took to release the Camshaft Sprocket Retaining Bolt was most enjoyable and satisfying.

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↓ The tool is offered up to the Camshaft Sprocket.
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↓ The buttons engage in the spokes of the Camshaft Sprocket, and come to a stop.
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↓ The 21mm socket and 600mm breaker bar are used to slacken the Camshaft Sprocket Retaining Bolt while the tool holds the Sprocket stationary against the force on the socket.
That's the cylinder head on the kitchen worktop. I'm doing the valve job in the kitchen as there is more room, and it's clean.
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↓ The widest part of each button is 25.4mm in diameter.
The narrowest part of each button (the part that engages in the spoke hole) is 24.9mm in diameter for a length of 10mm.
The widest part of the button will not enter the spoke hole and this allows the tool to rest securely against the Sprocket in a controlled manner.
Each button is drilled and tapped for an M10x1.5 bolt.
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↓ Here are all the bits.
The bars are made from 30mm x 5mm lacquered steel that has been laying around for a good few years.
The shortest bar is 140mm long, and the longest bar is 500mm long.
The bolts are M10x1.5 (old and reused).
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